7 Mistakes to Avoid When Developing Your Employer Brand Strategy

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Just like employee engagement, the concept of employer brand isn’t new. These days, we just talk about it differently and with a renewed focus. In fact, it’s been around for quite a while. It’s only the relative newbies like myself who have come to realize employer brand embodies everything that we are passionate about: employee value proposition, employee engagement, employee satisfaction and the marketing of that to employees. I’m sure thought leaders — and friends such as Richard Moseley (who wrote the book on employer branding) — will say, “I’ve been talking about this for years!” But you don’t always learn until you’ve actually tried. Here are some mistakes (that I’ve heard of or experienced myself) you should avoid to ensure you develop a strong employer brand that has you standing out in the crowd.

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How to Measure (So You Can Manage) Your Employer Brand

Employer branding is key to building your company’s reputation as an employer of choice and there are a growing number of companies who are seeing the value in putting resources and budget into this work. After initial activation, your employer brand should continue to evolve and be updated to accurately reflect changes within your organization. Therefore, the longer tail of any employer brand strategy is the sustainment and management of it. But you can’t manage what you don’t measure. And it is very hard to describe the impact you’re making to an organization without that measurement.

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Creating a Whole New Value Proposition for Millennials

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In the HR world, it’s not new to hear the term “Millennial” and how many organizations today are rethinking their workforce practices to attract them — individuals born after 1980 and who have come of age since the year 2000.

Many people have asked why all of this intense focus on Millennials? What makes them so special over Baby Boomers and Generation X? Quite simply, this group already makes up the largest generation in the US, and by year 2020, millennials will comprise nearly 50% of the workforce.

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